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ADDITIONAL INSECTS FROM COSTA RICA

GRASSHOPPERS

Ripipteryx limbata (Family Ripipterygidae) on a forest trail at an elevation of approximately 3,000 feet at Rancho Naturalista (22 February 2009). (Id. Hugh Rowell)

Often called monkey grasshoppers, members of the family Eumastacidae are well represented in Costa Rica. Note the family's typical perching position with the hind legs at right angles to the body. Homeomastax (possibly surda) male (19 February 2009) (Id. Hugh Rowell)

A male Silvitettix communis along a sunny roadside at Rincon on the Osa Peninsula (19 February 2009) (Id. Hugh Rowell)

This colorful grasshopper (Lithoscirtus viceitas: Subfamily Proctolabinae) was perched alongside a shaded forest trail at Rancho Naturalista (22 February 2009) (Id. Hugh Rowell)

A female Orphulella punctata, arguably the most widespread grasshopper in Costa Rica. Both green and brown forms were present at woodland edge, perched on sunny leaf litter at Esquinas Rainforest Lodge (16 February 2009).

Often less than one centimeter in length, pygmy grasshoppers may be common at muddy, sandy, or stony stream edges. Their taxonomy is in a state of disarray and they often remain unidentified. This one is no exception. Forest stream at Esquinas Rainforest Lodge (14 February 2009)

BUTTERFLIES

The first four species are satyrs (Family Nymphalidae) and suggest the diversity of this subfamily.

Pink-tipped Satyr (Cithaerias pireta pireta) on leaf litter in secondary forest at Bosque del Rio Tigre (20 February 2009)

 One-banded Satyr (Pareuptychia metaleuca) on a sunny forest trail at Rancho Naturalista (22 February 2009)

Luna or Moon Pierella (Pierella luna) on a forest trail at Esquinas Rainforest Lodge (12 February 2009)

Normally found in the forest understory, this Common Ur Satyr (Taygetis thamyra) ventured out to the patio at Rancho Naturalista) (23 February 2009)

The Banded Peacock (Anartia fatima) is one of the most characteristic butterflies at lower elevations in Mexico and Central America. This one was on a sunny roadside at Esquinas Rainforest Lodge (12 February 2009). 

HAIRSTREAKS

Tmolus (possibly echion) perched along a sunny trail at Esquinas Rainforest Lodge (14 February 2009) (Id. Kim Garwood)

METALMARKS 

A Purple-washed Eyemark (Mesosemia lamachus) basks at roadside. Bosque del Rio Tigre (18 February 2009)

Eurybia lycisca This one seemed territorial along a forest trail at Esquinas Rainforest Lodge (15 February 2009) 

These copulating Euselasia aurantia were perched on the underside of a Heliconia leaf along a broad, sunny trail at Bosque del Rio Tigre (18 February 2009) (Id. Kim Garwood)

SKIPPERS

Phanus sp. perched on the underside of a leaf along a forest trail at Esquinas Rainforest Lodge (12 February 2009)

Common Glassywing or Pompeius Skipper (Pompeius pompeius) on a sunny lawn at Esquinas Rainforest Lodge (15 February 2009)

A copulating pair of Saliana (perhaps esperi) along a sunny trail at the Wilson Botanical Garden in San Vito (13 February 2009)

For a superb collection of photos of tropical butterflies, see Kim Garwood and Richard Lehman's Neotropical Butterflies website

OTHER INSECTS

A stilt-legged fly (Family Micropezidae) that appears to mimic ants. This species is probably in the genus Taeniaptera. It was perched on a forest trail at Rancho Naturalista (23 February 2009) (Genus suggested by Josh Rose)

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 © Robert A. Behrstock 2015

Images may not be reproduced without the Photographer's permission.